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White Mountain and Little Colorado Wild Horses Gather

Comments due by Friday, May 7, 2010

BLM Requests Public Input on Plans to Gather Excess Wild Horses from the White Mountain and Little Colorado HMAs

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rock Springs Field Office is requesting public input on a proposal to gather "excess" wild horses from the White Mountain and Little Colorado Herd Management Areas (HMA). Gathering would start on or about Oct. 1, 2010 or after the next foaling season, July 1, 2011.

Comments must be received by May 7, 2010. Comments may be mailed or hand delivered to the Rock Springs Field Office at 280 Hwy 191 North, Rock Springs, WY 82901. Emailed comments MUST be addressed to: WhiteMountain_LittleColorado_HMA_WY@blm.gov. Electronic comments will only be accepted at above address. Include “White Mountain and Little Colorado HMAs Scoping Comments” in the subject line.  In Defense of Animals has a petition against the proposed gather.  It would be great if you sent a personalized email and signed the petition.

According the BLM, there are APPROXIMATELY 301 wild horses residing within the White Mountain HMA.  The appropriate management level (AML) for the White Mountain HMA is 205-300 wild horses.  The BLM contends that the AML is being exceeded by APPROXIMATELY 1 wild horse!

There are APPROXIMATELY 142 wild horses in the Little Colorado HMA.  The AML range for the Little Colorado HMA is 69-100 wild horses.

Census data for these HMAs was collected in May 2009.  The BLM determines the number of wild horses that each HMA can support through land-use planning efforts that involve public participation.

For more information, please contact Wild Horse Specialist Jay D'Ewart at 307-352-0331. 

BLM main page for the White Mountain & Little Colorado Herd Management Areas (HMAs) Gather

BLM map of the White Mountain and Little Colorado HMAs

White Mountain Herd Management Area

The White Mountain HMA encompasses 392,649 acres, of which 240,416 acres are BLM-administered public lands. The majority of the HMA consists of checkerboard land ownership within the the Union Pacific Railroad grant. Consolidated public lands with state school sections and small parcels of private land make up the remaining lands in the northeast section of the HMA. The HMA is a high plateau that overlooks Rock Springs. Elevations range roughly from 6,300 to 7,900 feet. Precipitation ranges 6-10 inches, predominately in the form of snow. The area is unfenced except for portions of boundary fence and right-of-way boundaries along I-80 and 191 north.

The AML for this HMA is 250 horses. A full range of colors is present. This herd has a lot of color in it, many of which are paints. Other colors are bay, sorrel, red roan, black, or gray. The Wyoming horses have a diverse background of many domestic horse breeds. They are most closely related to North American gaited breeds such as Rocky Mountain Horse, American Saddlebred, Standardbred, and Morgan. The horses range from 14 to 15.5 hands and weigh between 750 and 1,100 pounds mature weight. The health of the horses is good.

Domestic cattle and sheep utilize the area lightly in the summer and moderately in the winter. Vegetation in the HMA is dominated by sagebrush and grass, with saltbrush, winterfat, and greasewood intermixed. Horses typically use a high amount of grass species, the most favorable being needlegrass, Indian ricegrass, wheatgrass, and Sedges. The area supports significant wildlife populations including elk, deer, and antelope.

White Mountain Wild Horses.gif

 

Little Colorado Herd Management Area

The Little Colorado HMA encompasses 519,541 acres of BLM administered public lands. The majority of the HMA consists of consolidated public lands along with state school sections and, in the south of the HMA, Bureau of Reclamation lands. The HMA is bounded on the west by the Green River, on the east by Highway 191on the north by the Pinedale/Rock Springs Field Office boundary. The area is mostly rolling hills with significant canyons breaking up the area. Elevations range from approximately 6,300 to 7,900 feet, and precipitation ranges from 6-10 inches, predominately in the form of snow. The area is unfenced except for sections of the boundary fence between the Rock Springs and Pinedale Field Offices, and along Highway 191. The HMA is divided among Sublette, Lincoln, and Sweetwater counties.

The AML for this HMA is 100 horses. Most horses in this area are dark - bay, sorrel, brown, black or gray. The Wyoming horses have a diverse background of many domestic horse breeds. They are most closely related to North American gaited breeds such as Rocky Mountain Horse, American Saddlebred, Standardbred, and Morgan. The horses range from 14 to 15.5 hands and weigh between 750 and 1,100 pounds mature weight. The horse health is good with no apparent problems.

Domestic cattle and sheep utilize the area lightly in the summer and moderately in the winter. Vegetation in the HMA is dominated by sagebrush/grass, with saltbrush, winterfat, greasewood, and meadow species. Horses typically use a high amount of grass species, the most favorable being needlegrass, Indian ricegrass, wheatgrass, and sedges. The area supports significant wildlife populations including deer, antelope, and sage grouse.

Little Colorado Wild Horses.gif

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